NCAA Indoor Men Day 2 — JuVaughn Harrison Doubles

JuVaughn Harrison crafted a unique double when he won the high jump and long jump golds. (ERROL ANDERSON/THE SPORTING IMAGE)

5000: Wesley Kiptoo (Iowa State)

On paper, you had a single race, one where yearly list leader Amon Kemboi was the favorite on his home track. In real life, you had two races: one with Iowa State’s Wesley Kiptoo, putting on a solo master class in racing, and the other where everyone else fought for second in his wake.

Kiptoo entered the 25-lap contest so confident that he casually let everyone see his cards on the first lap. His apparent plan: to run away from the 15 others at the starting line. To do so he generated astonishing splits—59.79 for 2 laps, 2:01.08 for 4, 2:32.20 for the first kilo. Only Kemboi tried to stay close. He ran in 2nd for 11 laps, but the gambit failed, and he painfully faded to 13th.

Later, Kiptoo claimed that leading like that was not the plan at all. “I wanted to run with the pack,” he revealed. “After 800, there was nobody coming close, nobody trying to come with me. And I just went like that. I was like, ‘OK.’”

As Kiptoo steamed away (1600 in 4:06.75, 2000 in 5:11.53), the field fell farther and farther behind. Florida State senior Adrian Wildschutt took over the runner-up position. Far behind him, a chase pack led by Colorado State’s Eric Hamer churned out steady laps. At 3000, with Kiptoo hitting 7:55.53, Wildschutt and Kemboi were more than 5 seconds back, with Hamer’s pack another 5 in arrears.

As the leader kept churning out 32s and 33s, Hamer smelled a runner-up finish and started blazing 31s and 32s to reel in Wildschutt. He tagged him with 400 left. Up front, Kiptoo inevitably slowed, but not enough to let Hamer come close.

The Cyclone won in a meet record 13:23.77. Hamer finished 2nd in 13:29.60. One of the bigger surprises came from Michigan State senior Morgan Beadlescomb. Sixth with a lap to go, he exploded to a 26.85 closer, the fastest in the field by more than 2 seconds. His charge nearly caught Hamer as the Spartan finished 3rd in 13:29.96. The two moved to spots 5 and 6 among all-time U.S.-born collegians.

Kiptoo, not surprisingly, is the favorite for the NCAA XC race on Monday. When asked if he was concerned about running so fast with a hard 10K coming up, he said, “We have like 3 days. It’s not that hard… I’ll be good.” /Jeff Hollobaugh/


NCAA MEN’S 5000 RESULTS

(March 12)

1. *Wesley Kiptoo’ (IaSt-Ken) 13:23.77 PR (CL)

(pace—29.63, 30.17 [59.80], 30.39 [1:30.19], 30.90 [2:01.09], 31.12 [2:32.21], 30.85 [3:03.06], 31.63 [3:34.69], 32.07 [4:06.76], 32.37 [4:39.13], 32.41 [5:11.54], 32.39 [5:43.93], 32.79 [6:16.72], 33.13 [6:49.85], 32.72 [7:22.57], 32.97 [7:55.54], 33.18 [8:28.72], 32.93 [9:01.65], 33.09 [9:34.74], 33.42 [10:08.16], 32.72 [10:40.88], 32.66 [11:13.54], 33.09 [11:46.63], 32.81 [12:19.44], 32.54 [12:51.98], 31.80)

(finish—31.80, 64.34, 2:10.24);

2. Eric Hamer (CoSt) 13:29.60 PR (AmCL) (5, x AmC)

(29.96, 60.92, 2:04.99);

3. Morgan Beadlescomb (MiSt) 13:29.96 PR (6, x AmC)

(26.84, 58.41, 2:02.47);

4. Adriaan Wildschutt’ (FlSt-SA) 13:30.55 PR

(29.53, 61.32, 2:07.43);

5. Aaron Bienenfeld’ (Cinc-Ger) 13:31.65 PR

(29.69, 60.94, 2:05.17);

6. Shea Foster (SELa) 13:32.38 PR (7, x AmC)

(29.87, 61.02, 2:06.18);

7. Alec Basten (Mn) 13:32.98 PR (8, x AmC);

8. Ben Veatch (In) 13:33.50 PR (9, x AmC);

9. Andrew Jordan (Wa) 13:33.61 PR (10, x AmC);

10. *Jacob McLeod (Ar) 13:39.50 PR;

11. Devin Meyrer’ (Mi-Ger) 13:40.66 PR;

12. Gilbert Boit’ (Ar-Ken) 13:46.48;

13. Amon Kemboi’ (Ar-Ken) 13:50.10;

14. Alec Sandusky (Cinc) 13:54.96;

15. Colton Johnsen (WaSt) 14:01.86;

… dnf—*Matt Young (Ar).


Distance Medley: Oregon

Oregon — which at the end of January cranked out the fastest DMR of all-time, 9:19.42 — won as expected. The Ducks did it with Reed Brown substituting for Cole Hocker, whose 1200 leg jump-started the Collegiate Record time, and finished in 9:19.98, the No. 2 all-time mark.

While Oregon set the tone, the contest was close and startlingly deep. Three squads in all ran under the 9:24.52 time with which Oregon claimed a CR in 2020, with runner-up Mississippi at 9:20.75 and 3rd-place team Texas at 9:23.73. The race thoroughly rewrote the all-time list, with North Carolina in 4th being the first all American-born foursome and claiming the American Collegiate Record.

Carolina grad student Thomas Ratcliffe (2:53.90) led for most of the 1200 leg before Mississippi’s Everett Smulders (2:53.32) took it with just over a lap to go. Brown had the last move on the leg, though, pouncing in the final turn to open a 2m lead at the exchange.

On the penultimate bend of the 400 leg, Tar Heel senior Isaiah Palmer (45.67) overtook Duck soph Xavier Nairne (47.57) for the lead and Texas junior Jonathan Jones (45.54) moved the Longhorns into 2nd off the final curve. Nairne handed off roughly equal-3rd with Mississippi senior Elijah Dryer (46.80).

Tar Heel Allen Siegler (1:50.83) built an early cushion on the 800 leg but relinquished it to Mississippi’s John Rivera (1:47.35) going into their final go-around. Biding his time for 3-plus laps was 800 Collegiate leader Charlie Hunter of Oregon, who pounced on the last backstretch, measured his 1:46.70 effort around the curve and handed off to mile CR holder Cooper Teare a meter ahead.

As Teare led throughout the closing 1600 leg, four teams stuck close. With two laps to run Virginia Tech dropped back, leaving the eventual top 4 to duke it out. Teare raised the pace on the next backstretch and accelerated again at the bell, after which only Mississippi soph Mario García Romo could hang. On the final curve Teare (3:52.98) lifted again and rushed home some 6m ahead of Romo (3:53.28).

Said Teare, “I think it’s just a testament to the NCAA this year and kind of what everyone’s done over the [pandemic] year. Not only us. Everybody’s been in the same position and I think we’ve all kind of been better for the last year of not competing. It’s kind of bringing the best out of everyone.

“So absolutely, knowing that we had to run that time — the second-fastest team ever now, I guess — to do it, it’s definitely gratifying.

“I remember this morning I was watching the 2016 DMR when [Duck] Edward Cheserek came back after the 5K and split 3:52 on the anchor leg. I was looking at that team thinking, ‘Why can’t we do that? If I don’t get the stick in front, I’m confident I can do that.’

“So it was kind of just being ready for any scenario and knowing we’re in the best shape as possible that we could be in right now.” /Sieg Lindstrom/


NCAA MEN’S DISTANCE MEDLEY RESULTS

(March 12)

1. Oregon 9:19.98 (MR) (2 W, C) (in/out: 2 C)

(Cole Hocker 2:52.73, Xavier Nairne’ 47.57, Charlie Hunter’ 1:46.70, Cooper Teare 3:52.98);

2. Mississippi 9:20.75 (4 W; 3 C) (in/out: 4 C) (#3 school)

(Everett Smulders 2:53.32, Elijah Dryer 46.80, John Rivera’ 1:47.35, Mario García Romo’ 3:53.28);

3. Texas 9:23.73 (5 W; 4 C) (#4 school)

(Cruz Gomez 2:54.33, Jonathan Jones’ 45.54, Brendan Hebert 1:48.28, Crayton Carrozza 3:55.58);

4. North Carolina 9:25.80 AmCR (old AmCR 9:25.97 Texas ’08) (AL) (8 W; 2 A; 4 C)

(Ratcliffe 2:53.90, Palmer 45.67, Siegler 1:50.83, Tubby 3:55.40);

5. Virginia Tech 9:27.67 (7 A) (#9 school)

(Mills 2:54.77, Forrest 46.19, Yanga 1:49.13, Fleming 3:57.58);

6. Arkansas 9:33.65

(Walters 2:58.61, Milholen 45.85, Bartholomew 1:49.98, Kibet’ 3:59.21);

7. Indiana 9:34.30

(Browning 2:55.75, Vaughn 47.48, Williams 1:47.55, Jha 4:03.52);

8. Miami/Ohio 9:35.17

(S. Torpy 2:56.51, Finnegan 47.47, Schroff 1:49.37, C. Torpy 4:01.82);

9. Iowa State 9:36.00

(Schaefer 2:58.13, Gentil 46.65, Lomong 1:49.23, Too 4:01.99);

10. Texas Tech 9:38.89

(Sherrill 2:59.87, Stephenson 46.68, Cepus’ 1:49.02, Likins 4:03.32);

11. Tennessee 9:41.98

(Kay 2:59.05, Sacoor’ 46.38, Hoots 1:51.75, Crigger 4:04.80);

12. Alabama 9:50.92

(Shiflet 2:59.37, Serrano 46.98, Shannon 1:53.89, Jones 4:10.68).


wesley kiptoo 04 21 NCAA Indoor Men Day 2 — JuVaughn Harrison Doubles
Wesley Kiptoo’s 13:23.77 led a flood of PRs across the line in the 5000. (MIKE SCOTT)

High Jump: JuVaughn Harrison (LSU)

A double winner the last time he competed in an NCAA Championships, JuVaughn Harrison started his quest for an indoor HJ/LJ pairing to go along with his two ’19 outdoor golds with the vertical leap.

The favored LSU senior increased his lifetime best — and yearly collegiate leader — by 2cm with his first-attempt clearance at 7-6½ (2.30).

The 2nd- and 3rd-placers, Earnie Sears of USC and Tejaswin Shankar of Kansas State, each missed his only attempt at the height after having passed their third tries at the preceding height of 7-5¼ (2.27).

Harrison was the only jumper to pass the opening height of 6-9¾ (2.09), choosing to enter at 6-11¾ (2.13), which he cleared easily. He cleared his next two bars on first attempt, the second of which, 7-3 (2.21), gave him the outright lead of Sears, who had a pair of misses at 7-1¾ (2.18).

Harrison gave up the lead at 7-4¼ (2.24) when he missed his first attempt and watched Sears clear. But Harrison was back on form with a second-shot clearance, then followed that with his first attempt 7-5¼, while Sears and Shankar suffered their misses.

Harrison had hurt a hamstring at the SEC, but of today’s win he said, “It wasn’t my best competition. I did a lot of things wrong early on. The last two or three jumps, I finally put everything together. It really did hurt to have that miss on the record because you never know what else can happen, but I was able to get over that last bar.”

The question for Harrison after winning at 7-6½ was whether to go for another PR at 7-7 (2.31) or try for an Olympic qualifying 7-7¾ (2.33), or retire to prepare for the long jump. He chose the last. /Dave Johnson/


NCAA MEN’S HIGH JUMP RESULTS

(March 12)

1. JuVaughn Harrison (LSU) 7-6½ (2.30) PR (CL);

2. Earnie Sears (USC) 7-4¼ (2.24);

3. Tejaswin Shankar’ (KsSt-Ind) 7-4¼ (2.24);

4. *Vernon Turner (Ok) 7-3 (2.21);

5. *Corvell Todd (SnMs) 7-3 (2.21) PR;

6. *Justin Stuckey (Samf) 7-1¾ (2.18) PR;

7. *Brandon Burke (Buf) 7-1¾ (2.18);

8. Bryson Deberry (UTA) 7-1¾ (2.18);

=9. Allen Gordon (Ms) 6-11¾ (2.13);

=9. *Dontavious Hill (Aub) 6-11¾ (2.13);

11. *Nuh Andu’ (Akr-Qat) 6-11¾ (2.13);

12. ***Erhire Omamuyovwi’ (MTn-Ngr) 6-11¾ (2.13);

=13. Perry Christie (Rut) 6-11¾ (2.13);

=13. *Jack Scarborough (TxT) 6-11¾ (2.13);

15. *Chris Banks (Ok) 6-9¾ (2.08);

… nh—Greg Lauray (Pitt).


Long Jump: JuVaughn Harrison (LSU)

With about an hour between his 7-6½ (2.30) win in the high jump and the start of the long jump, JuVaughn Harrison was back at it. Alternately stretching out a sore hamstring and warming up for the long jump, Harrison got some additional relief as the 12th jumper in round 1.

Harrison opened with a 25-10¾ (7.89), good for a solid 3rd at the time, and 4th at the end of the first round. Florida State’s Isaac Grimes led at 26-8½ (8.14) with Carey McLeod of Tennessee just a centimeter back at 26-8¼ (8.13), followed closely by the 26-7¼ (8.11) PR of Missouri’s Ja’Mari Ward, the ’19 USATF outdoor champion. Grimes increased his lead in round 2, reaching 26-11¼ (8.21), the only one among the first 3 to improve in rounds 2, 3 or 4.

Harrison had improved however, reaching 26-3¾ (8.02) in the third round after a foul in round 2, but still sitting in 4th place. In round 4, Harrison reached 26-8½ (8.14) to move to 2nd place, a centimeter ahead of McLeod. In round 5, McLeod popped a PR 27-1¼ (8.26) to take the lead, dropping Grimes to 2nd and Harrison to 3rd. Harrison, the next jumper, responded with a PR of his own, a monster 27-8¾ (8.45) that trails only Miguel Pate and Carl Lewis on the collegiate all-time indoor list.

When McLeod fouled his round 6 jump, Harrison passed, then watched final jumper Grimes throw out a scare, his 27-4¾ (8.35) falling short of the win and finishing off a tremendous competition.

In ’19 Harrison had become the first collegiate jumper to win both the high jump and long jump outdoors. Today he became the first to win the same combo indoors. In the process, Harrison supplanted Germany’s Henry Lauterbach (7-6½/27-4¾) (2.30/8.35) as the best combination jumper in world history with Harrison’s 1-day pair of PRs giving him marks of 7-6½/27-8¾ (2.30/8.45).

Asked to compare this double and his SEC combo two weeks ago, Harrison said, “The difference is that they gave me about 30 minutes extra, so I had a bit more time to get treatment and wind down from high jumping and get ready for the long jump.” /Dave Johnson/


NCAA MEN’S LONG JUMP RESULTS

(March 12)

1. JuVaughn Harrison (LSU) 27-8¾ (8.45) PR (WL, AL, CL) (=8, x W; =3, x A; 3, 4 C) (in/out: 6, 11 C)

(25-10¾, f, 26-3¾, 26-8½, 27-8¾, f) (7.89, f, 8.02, 8.14, 8.45, f);

2. Isaac Grimes (FlSt) 27-4¾ (8.35) PR (11, x A; 6, =7 C)

(26-8½, 26-11¼, 26-11, 26-1, 26-7, 27-4¾) (8.14, 8.21, 8.20, 7.95, 8.10, 8.35);

3. *Carey McLeod’ (Tn-Jam) 27-1¼ (8.26) PR

(26-8¼, 26-2¾, 26-1¾, f, 27-1¼, f) (8.13, 7.99, 7.97, f, 8.26, f);

4. Ja’Mari Ward (Mo) 26-7¼ (8.11) PR

(26-7¼, f, 25-6, f, f, 25-3½) (8.11, f, 7.77, f, f, 7.71);

5. **Jeremiah Davis (FlSt) 25-10 (7.87)

(24-5, 25-10, f, 25-6¾, 25-3½, f) (7.44, 7.87, f, 7.79, 7.71, f);

6. *Ryan Brown’ (Ar-Jam) 25-8¼ (7.83);

7. **Matthew Boling (Ga) 25-5¼ (7.75);

8. Jalen Seals (TxT) 25-4¾ (7.74);

9. Allen Gordon (Ms) 25-4½ (7.73);

10. *Darius Clark (TxAM) 25-¾ (7.64);

11. ***John Baker (Ar) 24-4½ (7.43);

12. *Brandon Hicklin (NCAT) 24-3¾ (7.41);

13. *PJ Austin (Fl) 24-3 (7.39);

14. Ja’Von Douglas (NCSt) 23-11½ (7.30);

15. ***Malcolm Clemons (Fl) 23-5½ (7.15);

16. ***Cameron O’Neal (GaT) 22-8 (6.91).


Shot: Turner Washington (Arizona State)

Living up to his Collegiate Recordholder credential, Turner Washington controlled the competition from start to finish. The Arizona State junior’s 67-11 (20.70) opener was sufficient to make him the third Sun Devil after Ryan Whiting (3 times) and Jordan Clarke (twice) to claim an indoor shot title.

A battle among men throwing over 70 feet (21.33-plus) seemed possible, as seniors Tripp Piperi of Texas (71-4/21.74) and McKay Johnson of USC (70-4½/21.45) had both thrown that far this season. Each opened with a foul, as did Arizona’s Jordan Geist, who had tosses at that level in ’18 and ’19. Neither Geist nor Piperi ever found the range, finishing 13th and 14th. Overall, there wasn’t a single seasonal best recorded.

After fouling a second time, Johnson reached 66-3 (20.19) in round 3 and the mark held up for 2nd over North Dakota senior Alex Talley’s 65-1½ (19.85) also in frame 3.

Washington had improved to 68-10 (20.98) on his second but was not happy. He said, “If I hadn’t thrown 70, I was probably going to be pretty upset with myself since I knew that anyone at that meet like McKay could easily have thrown 70, and it helps if you can throw 70. So it was kind of like going into those last two rounds, ‘I’ve got to prove it to myself,’ pretty much that I’m still the man.”

He managed it in round 5 with 70-1 (21.36) followed by 69-11¾ (21.33) on his last. All five of his legal throws were good enough to win.

“Those throws they felt really close,” Washington said. “I still kind of missed them. But moving into outdoors we’ll take some time off from the shot and really just hammer out that technique and work out the kinks and hopefully become a lot more consistent.” /Sieg Lindstrom/


NCAA MEN’S SHOT RESULTS

(March 12)

1. *Turner Washington (AzSt) 70-1 (21.36)

(67-11, 68-10, f, 67-1¼, 70-1, 69-11¾) (20.70, 20.98, f, 20.45, 21.36, 21.33);

2. McKay Johnson (USC) 66-3 (20.19)

(f, f, 66-3, 64-9¾, 65-7, f) (f, f, 20.19, 19.75, 19.99, f);

3. Alex Talley (NDSt) 65-1½ (19.85)

(60-4, 63-2¼, 65-1½, 63-0, 64-½, 64-3¼) (18.39, 19.26, 19.85, 19.20, 19.52, 19.59);

4. Daniel McArthur (NC) 65-1¼ (19.84)

(65-1¼, f, f, 63-4¼, f, f) (19.84, f, f, 19.31, f, f);

5. *Burger Lambrechts’ (Nb-SA) 65-¾ (19.83)

(65-¾, f, f, f, 62-10½, 64-4½) (19.83, f, f, f, 19.16, 19.62);

6. *Jordan West (Tn) 64-6 (19.66);

7. **John Meyer (Mi) 63-11¾ (19.50);

8. **Maxwell Otterdahl (NDSt) 63-9 (19.43);

9. *Jonah Wilson (Wa) 62-11¼ (19.18);

10. *Kristoffer Thomsen’ (NDSt-Den) 62-10¾ (19.17);

11. Isaac Odugbesan’ (Al-Ngr) 62-10¾ (19.17);

12. Darius King (NnIa) 62-2½ (18.96);

13. *Jordan Geist (Az) 61-11¾ (18.89);

14. Tripp Piperi (Tx) 61-9¾ (18.84);

15. Cooper Campbell (Ok) 60-7¾ (18.48);

16. **Kevin Shubert (Nb) 59-8½ (18.20).


Heptathlon: Karel Tilga (Georgia)

With the strongest 1-2 punch in the history of the NCAA 7-eventer, Georgia sophs Karel Tilga (6264) and Kyle Garland (6200) broke into the higher reaches of the event’s all-time list by stringing together a daunting sequence of PRs. For Tilga, it was a perfect sweep: lifetime bests in all 7 events. Garland chalked up 3.

Leo Neugebauer of Texas may have hoped to overcome the Georgia juggernaut and started out on the right foot, the German taking the lead in the second event by 69 points with his PR 25-10 (7.87). Tilga narrowed the gap a bit with his PR 52-7½ (16.04) as shot leader, but Neugebauer still led by 33. It was Garland who finally caught him, leaping a PR 7-½ (2.15) to lead the high jump and finish Day 1 with 3555 points, ahead of Neugebauer (3534) and Tilga (3529).

Day 2 ended the Longhorn hopes quickly, a dnf in the hurdles knocking him out of contention. The Georgians now stood more than 100 points in the clear, Garland (8.07) building a lead of 68 points over Tilga (8.24 PR). The fastest hurdle flight went to Michigan’s Ayden Owens, whose 7.87 moved him to 3rd.

Tilga pulled 30 points closer with a PR 16-3¼ (4.96) vault to Garland’s PR 15-11¼ (4.86), as the two extended their lead over Owens to more than 200 points. Of his vaulting, Tilga said, “I knew I could PR, I didn’t know I had three of them in me.”

It came down to the 1000, and Tilga covered 5 laps the fastest, a 2:36.32 PR that delivered a 6264 tally, No. 2 in collegiate history, trailing only Ashton Eaton’s tough CR of 6499. “I knew I had to run 4 seconds faster than Kyle, and I knew I wanted to be No. 3 on the Estonian all-time list,” he said.

Garland’s 2:45.53 landed him at 6200, making him the No. 4 collegian ever. And Owens (2:40.07) held on for 5995 points in 3rd.

Said Garland, “We both knew that we could make history. We were just feeding off each other. It was a fun time.” And having lost a bet with his teammate, he added that he would be buying Tilga a dozen doughnuts in the morning. /Jeff Hollobaugh/


NCAA MEN’S HEPTATHLON RESULTS

(March 11–12)

1. **Karel Tilga’ (Ga-Est) 6264 PR (CL) (2, 2 C)

(7.09, 25-0/7.62, 52-7½/16.04 6-9/2.06 [3529–3], 8.24, 16-3¼/4.96, 2:36.32 [2735]);

2. **Kyle Garland (Ga) 6200 PR (AmCL) (10, x A; 4, 5 C; 3, 4 AmC)

(7.06, 24-7¼/7.50, 50-6¾/15.41, 7-½/2.15 [3555–1], 8.07, 15-11¼/4.86, 2:45.53 [2645]);

3. **Ayden Owens’ (Mi-PR) 5995 PR

(6.82, 24-1¾/7.36, 46-2/14.07 6-4¼/1.94 [3329–5], 7.87, 14-11½/4.56, 2:40.07 [2666]);

4. Felix Wolter’ (Pitt-Ger) 5907 PR

(7.04, 24-10½/7.58, 46-4¼/14.13 6-5½/1.97 [3335–4], 8.32, 15-11¼/4.86, 2:46.66 [2572]);

5. *Alex Spyridonidis’ (Aub-Gre) 5863 PR

(7.10, 24-5½/7.45, 44-2½/13.47 6-5½/1.97, 8.29, 16-7¼/5.06, 2:48.38);

6. **Max Vollmer’ (Or-Ger) 5726

(6.98, 23-4/7.11, 51-11/15.82 6-¾/1.85, 8.20, 15-7¼/4.76, 2:54.63);

7. *Jacob Spotswood (Al) 5715 PR

(7.18, 23-½/7.02, 44-6¾/13.58 6-5½/1.97, 8.39, 16-7¼/5.06, 2:48.21);

8. Denim Rogers (HousB) 5653 PR

(6.97, 22-6¼/6.86, 40-1¼/12.22 6-6¾/2.00, 7.97, 14-11½/4.56, 2:47.76);

9. **Daniel Spejcher (Ar) 5630

(7.08, 23-½/7.02, 48-9/14.86 6-¾/1.85, 8.31, 15-3½/4.66, 2:47.20);

10. *Isaiah Martin (Pur) 5501

(7.22, 23-½/7.02, 43-8¾/13.33 6-4¼/1.94, 8.16, 13-11¾/4.26, 2:45.98);

11. **Leo Neugebauer’ (Tx-Ger) 5125

(6.98, 25-10/7.87, 49-¾/14.95 6-8/2.03 [3534–2], dnf, 15-7¼/4.76, 2:51.07);

12. *Peyton Haack (Ia) 4813

(6.96, 23-6/7.16, 44-1¼/13.44 6-4¼/1.94, dnf, 15-3½/4.66, 2:45.45);

13. **Austin West (Ia) 4591

(7.01, 23-10¼/7.27, 42-4¾/12.92 6-2/1.88, 8.23, 12-4/3.76, dnf);

14. Etamar Bhastekar’ (Ar-Isr) 3656

(6.91, 23-10¼/7.27, 40-5/12.32 6-2/1.88, 10.00, nh, dnf);… dnf—*Kristo Simulask’ (Ok-Est)

(7.13, 23-4/7.11, 42-9/13.03, nh, dnc), -Markus Ballengee (Ar)

(7.36, 20-5¾/6.24, dnc). □

cshow NCAA Indoor Men Day 2 — JuVaughn Harrison Doubles

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